Quality quiz (May 2015): A classic quiz from Professor Cleary—and April’s quiz winners!

Mike ClearyWinners of last month’s quiz and a copy of Quality Quiz Classics are Bruce Newman (The Safariland Group); Richard Handfield (Bell Canada); and Stephen Burgin (Aallied Die Casting). Congratulations! For this month’s quiz, and a chance to win a copy of Quality Quiz Classics, submit your response by May 29.

To celebrate the life and work of Professor Cleary, we are featuring a classic quiz from our archives.

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Bytes and pieces: News you can use

Healthcare data: Facebook ratings for hospitals’ quality of care give accurate picture of readmission rates.

Big data and retail: Monitoring customer data, from transactions and demographics to social media posts, has become big business. A huge volume of detailed data is available for analysis.

Quality and change management: The full value of any improvement initiative is realized only when it is complemented by a robust change management strategy to effectively manage the people side of the change throughout the course of improvement cycle.

New release: SQCpack is an easy and scalable SPC solution that includes all the tools you need to comply with critical quality standards, reduce variability, improve profitability, and reduce costs. Test-drive the newest release for 14 days.

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Better than an insurance policy: Maintenance agreements give peace of mind

Barb ClearyIn every organization, one can find someone who continues to use old versions of major software programs long after everyone else has upgraded several times, not wanting to move outside a comfort zone that’s worked well, perhaps for years. It may be that he or she is not even aware that newer versions of the software—with features that may make life easier—are available and offer painless transition. Or oblivious to his or her status as a butt of MIS jokes about old fogeys using 10-year-old software.

Why upgrade, after all, if you have software that works? And why purchase a maintenance agreement if you’ve never had any problems that you couldn’t work out by calling your tech-savvy nephew in Chicago? After all, upgrade and maintenance agreements involve expense and paperwork, and force you to keep track of the multiple software programs that you use. And you may never have a question for a technical support analyst (especially if your nephew continues to help). Why bother?

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